Local News

Apollo medevac insurer back in business

A popular medevac insurer is back in business after a several-month shutdown.

Fairbanks-based Apollo Medi Trans failed to renew its license to operate in Alaska earlier this year. That meant it could not continue expiring policies or issue new ones.

A company official called it “an administrative mistake.”

Apollo was issued a state license in late August. But it needed to be reapproved by a larger company that provides the actual insurance.

That has happened. Apollo is again selling and renewing policies.

Meanwhile, Apollo has changed its rates.

It used to charge $125 a year for nationwide air and ground medical evacuation insurance. The rate is now $100 for a household. It’s limited to Alaska residents.

It also sells a three-week travelers’ policy for $45 for one person needing a medevac in Alaska, the Yukon Territory and Northern British Columbia.

Seattle-based Airlift Northwest, a medevac provider, sells a household policy for $99 a year. It covers Alaska, the Pacific Northwest, California and a few other states.

Medevac insurance is popular in Alaska because an air ambulance flight can cost tens of thousands of dollars. Some general health-insurance policies do not cover medevacs, or have high deductibles.

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